March 13, 2013

Minutes of the regular meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Skokie Public Library held in the Skokie Public Library Board Room, Wednesday, March 13, 2013.

CALL TO ORDER

John Graham, President, called the meeting to order at 7:31 p.m.

Members present: John Graham, President; Diana Hunter, Vice President/President Emerita; Susan Greer; Mark Prosperi; Zelda Rich; and Carolyn A. Anthony, Director.

Members absent: Karen Parrilli, Secretary; Jonathan H. Maks, MD.

APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF FEBRUARY 13, 2013

Mrs. Hunter made a motion, seconded by Mrs. Rich, to approve the minutes of the regular meeting of February 13, 2013, subject to additions and/or corrections. There being no additions/corrections, the minutes were approved and placed on file.

CONSENT AGENDA (Financial Statement; Circulation Report; Library Use Statistics; Report(s) from Department Head(s); Correspondence; Gifts; Personnel)

Mrs. Hunter made a motion, seconded by Mrs. Rich:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, SUBJECT TO AUDIT, AND THAT THE FOLLOWING CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS BE PLACED ON FILE:

1.      CIRCULATION REPORT

2.      LIBRARY USE STATISTICS

3.      REPORT(S) FROM DEPARTMENT HEAD(S)

4.      PROGRAM STATISTICS THIRD QUARTER F.Y. 2012-13

5.      GIFTS: FOR SUMMER READING CLUB: $3,500. FROM NORTHSHORE UNIVERSITY HEALTHSYSTEM; $1000. FROM ALLSTATE; IN MEMORY OF NORMAN J. KOZAK: $15. FROM JOHN AND BEVERLY KLAWANS; $20. FROM GAIL AND STEVE LEWIS; $50. FROM HARVEY AND ARLENE COUSTAN; $50. FROM JUDY ZARTMAN, $50. FROM BILL AND JANE HAGEDORN

6.      PERSONNEL: HIRE: JANET IRENE GARCIA, PART-TIME SECURITY GUARD, MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT, EFFECTIVE MARCH 6, 2013.

The motion passed unanimously.

BILLS

A motion was made by Mr. Prosperi, seconded by Mrs. Rich:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE BILLS, SUBJECT TO AUDIT.

The roll call vote for approval was unanimous.

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

USAGE----Circulation was down a little more than 5% in February, with one fewer day than February 2012, a leap year month. Weather may have also played a role since winter finally arrived in a series of smaller snow storms. All the circulation categories were down except for eBooks and Teen video games and the gate count was also down by about 3%. A total of 2,192 eBooks and eAudiobooks were circulated in February. This use of eBooks is greater than last February, but down from a high in January when eBooks were heavily borrowed after the holidays. The number of unique users of online databases has increased 39% from February, 2011, with total use up almost as much.

LIBRARY AWARE COMMUNITY AWARD----Mrs. Anthony had a call from the Editor of Library Journal informing her that Skokie Public Library has been selected as the Second place winner in the Library Aware Community Award competition hosted by Library Journal and funded by Ebsco. The Award emphasizes the library’s engagement with the community and recognizes a library’s success in making its community “aware” of what the library can do for it. The library must also deliver on that promise. The Award recognizes the development of effective programs, services, partnerships, and communications that result in healthier, more prosperous, and more engaged cities, towns, and villages. The Award consists of a monetary prize of $7,500. and a plaque which will be presented to the Mayor or City Manager, and Library Director during National Library Week April 14-20, 2013.

PUBLIC HEALTH PARTNER OF EXCELLENCE AWARD----Dr. Catherine Counard, Director of Health for the Village, has informed Mrs. Anthony that the Library will be recognized as a “Public Health Partner of Excellence” this year for providing critical support for public health activities. Deborah Grodinsky, Head of Adult Services, and Annabelle Mortensen, Reference Librarian, served on the Health Departments Advisory Committee for development of an I-Plan, specifying local health priorities for submission to the State. Mrs. Anthony invited Dr. Counard to present the plan to the Women’s Board at Skokie Hospital. Staff also proactively send articles of interest to Dr. Counard. The Award will be presented at the Village Board meeting April 3.

SIERRA----Implementation of the new Sierra library system was completed February 12 as scheduled without major incident. Not surprisingly, the conversion caused some problems for interrelated services such as the mobile catalog. Staff have been working out these issues, learning new procedures, and exploring new opportunities. There was not a steep learning curve, but it will take a while to realize the potential of the new system.

JOB SHADOW DAY----Two students from District 219 visited the Library for the day as part of the annual Job Shadow Day. The students were interested in computers and technology and spent time with several of our staff involved with the LAN, Digital Media Lab, and virtual services. We received excellent feedback from the students who said it was a “great learning experience.” One student commented that, “The mentors were very helpful and knowledgeable. I learned a lot of stuff about the library and they have a lot of cool new technology.”

IPRF GRANTS----The Library received two grants from the Illinois Public Risk Fund for $3,100. and $400. for projects related to safety in the Library. The larger grant will enable us to upgrade the floor lighting system in the Petty Auditorium which helps people move safely when the house lights are down. The smaller grant will be used to purchase “trax” slip-on safety cleats for Maintenance staff who work to clear ice and snow from sidewalks and the Library drives.

EASING OF RECIPROCAL BORROWING----The Vernon Area Public Library has eased its reciprocal borrowing restrictions. It previously had limits of 2 AV and 8 print materials per day, but will now allow checkout of up to 30 items of any type on an RBP card.

BANK CHARGES----A Board member inquired about bank charges on the Library’s accounts. Cole Taylor Bank charges are a little over $300. per month for a total of $2,906. for the Fiscal Year-to-Date. Cole Taylor gives the Skokie Public Library $3,000. each year for National Library Week programming so there is little net cost to the Library. During the same period, charges from JPMorgan Chase Bank were $1,478., with no grants to the Library. We have closed our payroll account with Chase. The payroll account was moved to North Shore Community Bank which offered no fees for the Library. However, that was with the understanding that the payroll account was only ACH debit. We also have to initiate some ACH transactions which is a Treasury Service with a charge of $30. per ACH transaction that we initiate.

STRATEGIC PLANNING----We have held two meetings of the Strategic Planning Committee, with presentations by Steve Marciani, Village Planning Director; Dr. Nanciann Gatta, Superintendent of District 219; and Jim Sczepaniak, Community Relations Manager for District 219. We learned that Common Core involves a push for collaborative learning and applied learning. About one third of District 219 students start their post-secondary education at Oakton Community College. Corrie Wallace, Director of the ELL Parent Center for Niles Township Schools, suggested that there are opportunities for the Library to help adults build technology skills and to help parents learn to pick out a book for their child and to assist their child with reading and learning. At the last meeting, we also talked about some of the strengths of the Library and the Village and the opportunities ahead for the next three years. An invitational “Community Conversation on the Future of the Public Library” was attended by 19 of about 45 people invited. Participants constituted a lively focus group with much to say about what they like currently (Bookmobile, SkokieNet, and Summer Reading program were singled out for praise), how they use digital materials, and what they thought some priorities should be. They also advised that future plans should be made with younger users in mind as they are the future of library use.

PROFESSIONAL AND COMMUNITY ACTIVITY----Mrs. Anthony attended an Advisory Board meeting for the GSLIS at Dominican University, a LACONI program on the Minnesota Library Futures Initiative, the ILA Legislative Breakfast, a meeting of the North Suburban Health Foundation, and a program at Oakton for Coming Together, with two professors presenting the ideas of Plato and Aristotle concerning happiness. From March 4-8, Mrs. Anthony was in Chicago at the Union League Club for the PLA Leadership Academy which she helped to develop. Mrs. Anthony served as one of eight coaches to 24 participants who were selected competitively from over 160 applicants. Toby Greenwalt, Virtual Services Coordinator, was one of the attendees. Mrs. Anthony will be attending the Public Library Directors Symposium in San Francisco March 20-22 as Innovative Interfaces has a new owner and she is eager to hear about changes and operations.

MOVER AND SHAKER----Skokie Public Library’s Supervisor of Lab Assistants Mikael Jacobsen was chosen as one of Library Journal’s Movers and Shakers, a group of 50 up-and-coming librarians. Mick was nominated by Toby Greenwalt.

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FY 2013-2014

In light of receipts this year-to-date, Mrs. Anthony has made slight adjustments in two of the anticipated revenue categories for FY 2014. The projection for Corporate Replacement Tax has been reduced from $350,000. to $325,000., both because the Library had 34% still to collect with 25% of the year remaining at nine months and because a pattern of the collections over the past four years shows a lesser collection in even-numbered years. (A share of Corporate Replacement Tax is allocated to the Library each year by the Village.) The projected revenue from Fines and Fees has also been decreased from $210,000. to $200,000. As we have made it easier for people to renew their materials online remotely, renewals have increased and revenue from fines is lagging.

On the expense side, Mrs. Anthony has adjusted the Salary line from 2% to 3% for an added cost of $60,599. This year, the Salary line will be quite fully expended. In order to accommodate a salary scale adjustment of 1.1% and 2% performance-based increases for most staff, a 3% adjustment to the Salary line is advisable.

In terms of Capital expense, we will need to replace the telephone system for about $80,000. We also anticipate HVAC expense of at least $60,000. for a new automated management system, coil cleaning, isolation valve replacement, replacement of cooling tower screens, replacement of variable frequency drives on two fan systems, and other projects outside the scope of annual maintenance. Replacement of the elevator door operators for both lobby elevators is estimated at $30,000. Another $30,000. will be needed for some asphalt improvements for deteriorating areas of the west and south drive. Some improvements to concrete curbing and plantings along Oakton Street will be handled within the scope of Building Maintenance. The Library Van will be eleven years old, but seems to be functioning well, with fewer than 70,000 miles registered.

The Operating Budget does not need to be approved until the April meeting.

Brief discussion followed.

APPROVAL OF ADOPTION OF WAGE AND SALARY ADJUSTMENT FOR FY 2014

The Board has adopted the Bureau of Labor’s figure for the increase in wages and salaries for state and local government workers as a guide to annual adjustment of the salary scale. Last month, Mrs. Anthony gave the Board the table from the Bureau of Labor showing an annual increase of 1.1% for the calendar year 2012.

Mrs. Anthony distributed a chart showing what the salary scale would look like with a 1.1% cost of living adjustment across the scale. For reference purposes in reviewing the figures, a beginning Circulation Clerk at S-4 would start at $28,752., a beginning MLS Librarian would start at P-3 $44,709., and a beginning Custodian M-1 at $33,517.

Mrs. Anthony recommends that the Board adopt this scale with a general increase of 1.1% for all staff effective with the paycheck of May 10. Mrs. Anthony also recommends that staff who are not at top-of-scale be eligible for a 2% increase at the time of their annual review. No staff would receive more than a total increase of 3.1% and most will get effectively less since performance reviews are given throughout the year at the time of the employment anniversary.

While the entire Operating Budget is generally not approved before April, the Board has typically voted on the salary increases in March since staff salaries are such a large part of the Operating Budget that any change in Salaries needs to be considered before the Operating Budget is up for final review and adoption.

A motion was made by Mrs. Hunter, seconded by Mr. Prosperi:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE A 1.1% COST OF LABOR ADJUSTMENT FOR ALL STAFF EFFECTIVE ON THE PAYCHECK RECEIVED MAY 10, AND A 2.0% INCREASE AT THE TIME OF AN EMPLOYEE’S PERFORMANCE REVIEW FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014.

The roll call vote for approval was unanimous.

APPROVAL OF NEEDED REPAIRS

The Board recently approved a policy that emergency repairs above $10,000. could be made between Board meetings with the approval of two Board members. We could not get quotes for restoration of the walls in the areas affected by the water in Youth Services until the mold was removed which happened the night of February 13, after the Board meeting. Parts of both rest rooms were affected as well as one wall of the craft room and the storage closet. The repairs were expensive because the sink and toilet had to be removed to facilitate drywall replacement and tiling and then the fixtures needed to be reinstalled. The sink in the craft room also needed to be reinstalled. Rich Simon, Head of Maintenance, had three quotes as follows:

-Anix Builders, Rolling Meadows                                                           $10,075.00

-W.B. Olson, Inc, Northbrook           time and materials not to exceed  $11,000.00

-Ward Contracting & Building Restoration Inc, Hodgkins                    $10,250.00

Mr. Graham and Mrs. Rich approved the quote from W.B. Olson, Inc. since the quotes were all fairly comparable; W.B. Olson is nearby; and the Library has had experience with W.B. Olson. (They installed the RFID return stations in Circulation a couple years ago.)

The cost of the mold removal from Servicemaster came to $5,401.86. The exact cost of the repairs by W.B. Olson won’t be known until they complete the work on March 5. On the basis of approval by two Board members, work began Tuesday, February 26 after W.B. Olson obtained a permit from the Village. Since both rest rooms in Youth Services and the Craft Room were unusable after the demolition for mold removal, it was important that we had restoration of the areas as quickly as possible.

Board ratification of the expense by W.B. Olson not to exceed $11,000. is requested.

A motion was made by Mrs. Rich, seconded by Mr. Prosperi:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES RATIFY THE QUOTE FROM W.B. OLSON, INC. IN AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $11,000 FOR REPAIR OF THE TWO REST ROOMS, THE CRAFT ROOM, AND THE CRAFT ROOM CLOSET AFTER MOLD REMEDIATION.

The roll call for approval was unanimous.

APPROVAL OF ENCLOSING THE TEEN AREA

Jessi Schulte, our Teen Librarian, has been working with a Teen Advisory Group to obtain their input on how we could make the Teen Area on the first floor more accommodating to their interests. While teens in serious study mode make use of the tables and study rooms on the second floor, they would really like an area for more informal collaboration. This could involve participation in computer gaming or even preliminary work on a theatrical production since the drama department at District 219 is popular and thriving. Such “on-the-floor” programming space is all part of the multifunctional and flexible space design for contemporary areas for teens. Staff have visited new teen spaces at the Gail Borden and Schaumburg Township District Library to see what has been done there.

In response to a survey of high school students in December, 2010, when asked what would make the Teen Corner more appealing, the most common responses were: more computers and more comfortable furniture as well as: a bigger space, music, food, a printer, and being able to talk without disrupting other people outside the Teen Corner. There is also a desire to keep it for high school students only. When Hallett was in the Library with the range mover during work on the second floor, we had them move some ranges in Readers Services to enlarge the space for teens. We have been working with Architect Paul Steinbrecher on some exciting ideas that are quite simple and allow for the flexibility the teens desire. For example, Paul is proposing a cork floor, a computer area at one end of the room, and some light-weight cubes that could form an impromptu stage at the other end.

A necessary prerequisite to the development of a flexible, collaborative space is to enclose the area. Because the Teen Area is part of the space that was added on in 2002, it will be relatively easy to enclose the space by adding KI pre-constructed walls to two sides of the room. The wall on the east side facing the Readers Services Department will be glass while the wall on the north side facing the stacks will be solid. The glass wall on the east side, visibility through the south courtyard, and a security dome with images displayed at the Readers Services Desk will be used to monitor the space.

KI walls were used in the new Business Center and to create five additional study rooms on the second floor. They are as effective as masonry walls in containing sound. Mrs. Anthony distributed a quotation from KI for the walls as described to enclose the Teen Area.

Board approval of the quotation in the amount of $14,783.08 is requested.

A motion was made by Mrs. Greer, seconded by Mrs. Rich:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE QUOTE FROM KI TO ENCLOSE THE TEEN AREA IN THE AMOUNT OF $14,783.08.

Lengthy discussion followed. The Board voiced their concerns about enclosing the Teen Area, specifically segregating the area so adults could not use the area, the cost of furniture and computers, the supervision of the teens, not being a recreational center (video games on computers); and the walls compartmentalizing the Library instead of keeping it an open space.

Mrs. Anthony stated that with the current academic emphasis on Common Core – everything is experiential and collaborative.

A motion was made by Mr. Prosperi, seconded by Mrs. Greer to table this item until the May Board meeting at which time Jessi Schulte will come to the meeting and more complete plans for the Teen space will be presented.

APPROVAL OF PURCHASE OF CHAIRS

In the renovation of public areas on the second and first floors, we have tried to clarify the types of use appropriate to each area. The second floor has more tables for work and more study rooms for collaborative projects, suited to the collection of nonfiction and reference materials on that floor. The first floor has more popular materials with fiction, audio-visual resources, and the Youth Services Department. Patron use in these areas generally involves more talking and movement.

We propose to purchase twelve used Knoll Brno chairs at $1,050. each for a total of $12,985. including delivery, to be placed on the first floor as an option for comfortable, yet firm seating for reading. While the low-slung upholstered armchairs are favored by some patrons, others find them too deep for comfort and too low to get up from easily.

A grouping of these Brno armchairs will be put in the area of parquet floor by Authors’ Row, outside of the interior courtyard. Situated off a corridor, between tall stacks and away from other seating areas, we envision this becoming used at times as an informal meeting area for reading by a local author. A sign could simply be posted by the area indicating that there will be a reading at 7pm, much the way the bookstores have readings on the floor. This will enable the Library to support authors in a growing wave of self-publishing, made possible by Amazon and digital options.

The chairs, though used, have the sturdy tubular steel frame and will receive new foam and durable leather upholstery. Mrs. Anthony requested Board approval of the purchase through Katie’s Chambers, Ltd. of twelve Brno chairs in black leather for a total of $12,985.

A motion was made by Mr. Prosperi, seconded by Mrs. Hunter:

MOTION:       THAT THE BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES APPROVE THE QUOTE FROM KATIE’S CHAMBERS, LTD. FOR THE PURCHASE OF TWELVE BRNO CHAIRS IN BLACK LEATHER IN THE AMOUNT OF $12,985.

The roll call vote for approval was unanimous.

QUARTERLY REPORT ON EBOOKS

Teri Room, Coordinator of Collection Development, prepared the following report on eBooks at Skokie Public Library:

The changeover to OverDrive as a standalone went smoothly with a new interface coming in April. The new interface will make it easier to check out and download eBooks and for some books, no downloading— the books can be read immediately on the computer or tablet screen.

Staff are considering adding a platform: either 3M which includes eBooks from Penguin, but with a 6-month delay, or Baker & Taylor which includes eBooks from Scholastic.

MacMillan plans to sell some backlist eBook titles to libraries with a 52 checkout or 2 year limit. Pre-loaded Kindles continue to circulate well and staff keep adding new titles.

 

eBooks Circulation

February 2013

February 2012

Percentage change

eReaders

   24 Kindles

   21 Sony Readers (adult and youth)

43 checkouts

20 checkouts

Up 115%

eBooks from OverDrive

1855 checkouts

1195 checkouts

Up 55%

eAudiobooks from OverDrive

Fewer titles to choose from so far compared to last year due to changeover

337 checkouts

448 checkouts

Down 24%

eBooks from Safari

359 sessions

unknown

 

eBooks from Gale

180 full-text retrievals

unknown

 

eBooks from Tumblebooks

241 book views

unknown

 

Zinio (currently 60 magazines)

304 clicks

NA

 

Issues that the SPL eBook Group is currently working on include: continuing to look for other eBook sources; waiting for a change in the catalog; displaying in the catalog record if an eBook is checked out; and learning more about Hoopla from Midwest Tape, a media streaming platform that will include movies and TV shows.

Brief discussion followed.

FEES FOR LIBRARY PROGRAMS

Mrs. Anthony stated that a Board member has asked that the Board reconsider the possibility of fees for library programs. This issue is a complex one that has a number of considerations. For background information, Mrs. Anthony distributed the Board’s “Rationale for Fees” as adopted in 1993 and last modified in September, 2009. The Rationale maintains that the Library “offers basic library service…as a public good, supported by general tax revenues.” The Library has generally offered library programs for free, within this rationale. There have been a few exceptions. Mrs. Anthony recalls a babysitting program that Youth Services used to offer for middle school children in partnership with the American Red Cross. The American Red Cross had a book/resource guide for the course that cost $10.00 per person. We indicated upfront that anyone who wanted to attend the program for certification by the American Red Cross would need to pay the $10.00 fee for the guide. This did not pose a problem that we were aware of and there was generally a waiting list for the class.

Similarly, the Library plans to show the documentary film “Of Two Minds”, about bipolar condition in partnership with Turning Point in early April. The film’s Director and one of the subjects from the film will be present for discussion and questions following the film showing. Turning Point was aware that some people want to receive CPU’s for participation in the program. Oakton Community College will take responsibility for issuing the CPU’s and collecting the associated fee for any attendees who would like to receive that credit. Those transactions will take place online in advance of the program date. Other persons will attend the program without any fee (and will not receive CPU’s for doing so.)

In years past, staff have raised the possibility of charging a nominal fee for some programs as incentive for people to follow through on advance registration. Unfortunately, with no charge, some people feel free to change their mind at the last minute and not show for a program for which they have registered. This is particularly unfortunate when there is a waiting list of other people who would have liked to attend. There is some evidence that even a minor financial stake such as $5.00 can serve as incentive to follow through on attendance. Currently, staff do not believe this would be practical or effective.

Another circumstance is an attempt to recover costs for art materials for a craft program or ingredients for a cooking program. We generally have avoided this issue by having children make crafts using milk cartons and paper towel tubes with expense only for paints and decoration. We have sought sponsors for cooking programs and/or made small batches of the prepared food, giving attendees only a small sample.

A possibility has been brought up of inviting bigger-name speakers or programs for which the Library would need to pay more and therefore might want to charge to recover costs. One difficulty is that the Petty Auditorium, our largest venue, has a maximum capacity of 211 people. Would 200 people pay $25.00 each to hear a speaker that cost the Library $5,000. to book? With that kind of fee, people might want to reserve seats together in a certain row or have other considerations that the Library could not meet. Meanwhile, many people would feel excluded from attendance at the program because of the fee. The “big-name” speaker might also generate much more interest than the Library is able to handle, tying up staff in turning down potential attendees, for a net negative reaction. A lesser fee of $10.00 or so would not generate enough revenue to secure a “big-name” speaker. In addition, charging fees for some speakers might cost us the goodwill of others who have appeared at the Library in the past for an honorarium, knowing that we are a not-for-profit that does not charge for programs.

Mrs. Anthony’s recommendation would be to maintain the general practice of not charging for programs sponsored by the Library, with individual cases brought to the Board’s attention if there is a compelling rationale for a fee. It may be that a partnership opportunity or other consideration would make a fee advisable in some circumstances.

Lengthy discussion ensued. It was decided that Mrs. Anthony would ask Christie Robinson, Manager of Marketing and Programs, to investigate the actual cost of bringing the play “Defamation” to the Petty Auditorium stage; how much would need to be charged to attendees and the cost to the Library. This information can then come to the Board at a future meeting.

REACHING ACROSS ILLINOIS LIBRARY SYSTEM (RAILS)

The following are highlights of the February 22, 2013, RAILS Board of Directors meeting’s videoconference and information taken from the Board documents. The meeting was held at the East Peoria Service Center.

Treasurer’s Report: As of January 31, 2013, RAILS has a $12,800,000 cash balance with expenses under budget at about 10%. This cash balance reflects approximately seventeen months of operating funds. Utility expenditures are under budget by $70,000.

Director’s Report: Associate Executive Director Jane Plass reported that on April 16, 2013, Board members from RAILS, IHLS, and Chicago Library System will meet in Springfield hosted by the Illinois State Library. A working committee comprised of library system members throughout the state has met to investigate an eBook program for Illinois, looking at two models: an in-state system based on a “vendor-hosted platform” and a multi-state consortium. More meetings are planned.

Illinois State Library: Staff are busy processing the certification of all library members. As an incentive, a “Back to Books” grant of $2,500 is being offered to those libraries that have completed the certification program. Applications are being accepted and need to be received no later than March 15. There are still fewer than 700 library members who have yet to complete the process. Also, Anne Craig announced that LSTA grants will most likely be affected by 7 to 8% if the federal “sequestration” goes into effect as of March 1.

Facilities: The City of Wheeling has approved a special use permit for Shir Hadash Synagogue, buyer of the former NSLS facility. Now staff is working on preparing a lease-back agreement to house its delivery services. Staff has been negotiating with the Regions Bank for the East Peoria facility’s upcoming loan payment. The Board was asked to consider paying in full the loan in August 2013 or refinance the existing loan. The Finance Committee recommended paying off the mortgage by August 2013 with the proceeds from the sales of the Wheeling and Shorewood facilities. The Board approved their recommendation. In answer to Anne Craig’s question about videoconferencing, staff plan on continuing videoconferencing capabilities at both the East Peoria and Wheeling facilities.

Delivery: At their February 13 meeting, the Delivery Committee considered several pilot study options for delivery services. The committee’s recommendation to the Board is to consider a RFP for outsourcing delivery from the Burr Ridge site. ISL recommended that the Board also consider another pilot study and use an established system, LANTER. The Board approved moving forward with this recommendation and agreed this is step one of a multi-step process. A committee member expressed hope that LANTER would bid on the RFP.

Personnel: Veronda Pitchford, previously from Chicago Library System and Metropolitan Library System, has been hired as the new Director of Membership Development and Resource Sharing.

RAILS Bylaws: The Board approved changing the bylaws to allow the term of office to be effective until the first Board meeting of the new fiscal year, rather than the end of the fiscal year or June 30. This will assure that the Board will retain its officers without interruption. Final approval is required from ISL.

The next RAILS Board of Directors meeting will be on Friday, March 22, 2013, Western Illinois University, Macomb, Illinois.

COMMENTS FROM TRUSTEES

Mrs. Hunter read in the March 4, 2013 News from the Illinois Library Association email that ILA’s Public Policy Committee re firearm concealed carry legislation stated that, “The committee reaffirmed ILA’s position to not oppose such legislation so long as it includes local control for libraries, schools, and higher education institutions to determine whether firearms would be permitted in their individual facilities.” Mrs. Hunter believes the committee should have opposed the that legislation. by merely thinking about library safety rather than the broader picture of public safety. (corrected at 4/10/13 Board meeting)

Mr. Prosperi received the Library newsletter today and was sorry to have missed some of the programs.

ADJOURNMENT

At 8:49 p.m. a motion was made by Mr. Graham, seconded by Mrs. Rich to adjourn the regular meeting. The motion passed unanimously.

__________________________________

            Karen Parrilli, Secretary