June 19, 2013

Minutes of the regular meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Skokie Public Library held in the Skokie Public Library Board Room, Wednesday, June 19, 2013.

CALL TO ORDER

John Graham, President, called the meeting to order at 7:32 p.m.

Members present: John Graham, President; Diana Hunter, Vice President/President Emerita; Karen Parrilli, Secretary; Susan Greer; Jonathan H. Maks, MD; Mark Prosperi; Zelda Rich; and Carolyn A. Anthony, Director.

Visitor present: Dr. Irwin Rich, 9360 Skokie Boulevard, Skokie, IL (arrived at 8:10 p.m.).

APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF MAY 8, 2013

Mrs. Hunter made a motion, seconded by Mrs. Parrilli, to approve the minutes of the regular meeting of May 8, 2013, subject to additions and/or corrections. There being no corrections, the minutes were approved and placed on file.

Review of Closed Session Minutes

A motion was made by Mrs. Hunter, seconded by Mr. Parrilli:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES FINDS THAT THE NEED FOR CONFIDENTIALITY STILL EXISTS FOR THE JULY 11, 2007, AUGUST 15, 2007, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, SEPTEMBER 15, 2010, JANUARY 12, 2011, SEPTEMBER 14, 2011; AND AUGUST 15, 2012 MINUTES AND THEY SHALL REMAIN CLOSED.

The motion was approved unanimously.

CONSENT AGENDA (Financial Statements; Circulation Report; Library Use Statistics; Annual Reports F.Y. 2012-2013; Report(s) from Department Head(s); Program Statistics Fourth Quarter F.Y. 2012-2013; Gifts; Personnel)

Mrs. Hunter made a motion, seconded by Mr. Prosperi:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, SUBJECT TO AUDIT, AND THAT THE FOLLOWING CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS BE PLACED ON FILE:

1.      CIRCULATION REPORT

2.      LIBRARY USE STATISTICS

3.      ANNUAL REPORTS F.Y. 2012-2013: GENERAL OPERATING FUND; RESERVE FUND FOR THE PURCHASE OF SITES AND BUILDINGS; 2001 DEBT FUND; STATISTICAL SUMMARY; PROGRAM STATISTICS; ADULT SERVICES DEPARTMENT; CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT; TECHNICAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT; YOUTH SERVICES DEPARTMENT

4.      REPORT(S) FROM DEPARTMENT HEAD(S)

5.      PROGRAM STATISTICS FOURTH QUARTER F.Y. 2012-2013

6.      GIFTS: ONE OPTELEC CCTV FROM JIM HUBBERTS; $15.26 FROM DIANA HUNTER IN MEMORY OF JAMES KAKARAKIS FOR PURCHASE OF A BOOK; FOR SUMMER READING PROGRAM: $500. FROM EVANSTON SUBARU IN SKOKIE; $500. FROM HAROLD J. KRINSKY, DDS, LTD.; $500. FROM DENGEOS, INC.; $1,000. FROM FIRST BANK & TRUST; $2,000. FROM ROSS STORES, INC.

7.      PERSONNEL: PROMOTIONS: JENNIFER WILKIN, FROM PART-TIME COMPUTER LAB ASSISTANT, YOUTH SERVICES DEPARTMENT, TO FULL-TIME YOUTH SERVICES LIBRARIAN, EFFECTIVE JUNE 10, 2013; JUDY PAPKE, FROM PART-TIME DEPARTMENTAL SECRETARY, ADULT SERVICES DEPARTMENT, TO FULL-TIME ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, ADMINISTRATION, EFFECTIVE JULY 15, 2013; TERMINATION: DIANA RITTER, FULL-TIME ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, ADMINISTRATION, EFFECTIVE JULY 26, 2013.

The motion passed unanimously.

BILLS

A motion was made by Mrs. Parrilli, seconded by Mrs. Rich:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE BILLS, SUBJECT TO AUDIT.

The roll call vote for approval was unanimous.

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

USAGE----Circulation in May was 167,278 for a decrease of less than one percent. Adult book circulation was up nearly 2% while the circulation of Youth books climbed 3.6%. Bookmobile circulation was down more than 20% due to five days off the road for repairs. Reference questions and laptop use were both up as was the gate count which increased nearly 16% to almost 83,000. Database use was up 46% from last May primarily due to access to digital book sources although the use of databases such as CultureGrams was also up in May. The number of individuals logging in during the month was up 70% from last May.

LIBRARYAWARE AWARD----Personnel representing the firms Ebsco and Novelist came to Skokie May 20 to present the Village the second place award in the LibraryAware competition. Under the auspices of Library Journal, this new award recognizes communities that are aware of, and use, the services of the public library in their community. The presentation was made at a Village Board meeting and the bronze plaque will hang in Village Hall. The Library received a check for $7,500. and a quantity of LibraryAware clings that people can put in their windows.

GRANT FROM NLM----The Library has been awarded a grant of $4,496. by the National Library of Medicine for an Outreach Express project “Health Information Outreach to the Skokie Assyrian Community.” Kate Belogorsky worked with agencies in the community to prepare the grant proposal which will provide easy-to-read health/medical materials on diabetes, anatomy and nutrition and assist in the development of marketing materials to improve awareness of area healthcare resources.

EGYPT TRIP----Mrs. Anthony’s trip to Egypt went smoothly and was definitely a memorable experience. She made three different presentations in four cities over five days, with one presentation each day Sunday through Thursday. Topics were programming in libraries (particularly for adults), planning for library service (a 4 hour workshop), and the role of professional library associations in the U.S. Aside from the presentation at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo which was in English only, simultaneous translation to and from Arabic through headphones was made available elsewhere. People were very friendly and she had a couple fans who came to all three of her Cairo-area presentations. Librarians in Egypt face some unique problems due to their political situation. Former First Lady Suzanne Mubarek was a strong supporter of public libraries in the Cairo area which now suffer from the “taint” of that administration with consequent problems in obtaining funding and support from the current government. The librarians were interested in library service in the U. S. and inquired about opportunities for exchanges. One librarian had attended the Mortensen program at the University of Illinois. The presentations took Mrs. Anthony north to Alexandria and east several hours along the delta to a university town with a library school program. A driver from the Embassy took her everywhere in a van. Mrs. Anthony was treated to a VIP tour of the new library/museum in Alexandria which is impressive. She also had dinner with some librarians from the Alexandrian Library and a chance to talk about what their work life is like. When her presentations were done, she had the opportunity to visit the Pyramids and Sphinx at Giza, the Egyptian Museum, the Souk (market), and the old section of Cairo which included visits to houses of worship from the Coptic Christian, Greek Orthodox, Jewish, and Muslim faiths. There were no demonstrations when she was in Cairo, but the subway at Tahrir Square was closed off and there were numerous concrete barricades blocking access to the U.S. Embassy. The sense she got was that people feel their country is still in transition.

ULC INNOVATION AWARD----Skokie Public Library will receive an honorable mention award for the Business and Career Center at the Urban Library Council’s breakfast session Friday morning, June 28. The award is part of the Urban Library Council’s Innovation program which seeks to highlight creative and responsive public library service developments.

EDGE INITIATIVE----The Library will be one of twenty-five libraries in Illinois to participate in the EDGE initiative this summer. Edge is a management and leadership tool for public libraries related to the use of technology to meet community needs. The Edge initiative was developed by a national coalition of leading library and local government organizations, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and led by the Urban Libraries Council. This summer, staff will conduct an assessment which is designed to determine not just what technology is in use, but how it is employed in furthering service to the community. Outcomes will be reported to the Board.

NILES TOWNSHIP PROPERTY TAX COALITION----Mrs. Anthony attended a meeting of the Niles Township Property Tax Coalition, a group representing local taxing bodies that continues to work with the law firm of Franczek Radelet to challenge property tax appeals by area corporations. Appeals continue to be more Tax Objection Complaints than PTAB. We always get a report on recent activity re appeals as well as legislative initiatives related to the property tax. For example, there was a bill SB1403 that would have amended the property tax code to allow a delay in the paying of property taxes if an appeal has been filed. The bill was deferred, but could return. Although the Coalition’s action has frequently reduced the final settlement and refund, over the years these repeated appeals have reduced the portion of the property tax paid by corporate entities, thereby increasing the portion paid by homeowners. Skokie Public Library’s share of expense for appeals this past year was $2,928.68.

STATE FUNDING FOR LIBRARIES----Before adjourning May 31, the Illinois Legislature approved increased funding for libraries that will mean increases in the area and per capita grants to systems and also an increase in the per capita grants for Illinois public libraries. The move started in the House on Memorial Day with an amendment to House Bill (HB) 214 that increased library funding from $8,782,400 to $12,482,400. The ILA Legislative Advocacy Network sprang into action with calls and the amendment passed out of committee and was voted by the House the next day. The bill passed the full Senate May 31.

VILLAGE OF SKOKIE NEWS----Village Manager Al Rigoni will retire from his position at the end of December this year after 37 years with the Village including about 25 years as Village Manager. Within the past year, the Village Finance Officer and another key position in that office have turned over so we are dealing with significant change in some of the key positions for Library interaction with the Village. On an unrelated note, Mrs. Anthony learned that the Village is planning on having a mobile police van that will visit neighborhoods, modeled on the Library’s Bookmobile.

ALA ANNUAL CONFERENCE----Mrs. Anthony will attend the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago June 27-July 2. Tuesday morning, July 2, she will be installed officially as the President of the Public Library Association for a term of one year. She is already engaged in advancing her primary project with the formation of a PLA Performance Measures Task Force that will recommend a set of measures that capture library services offered by a majority of public libraries and the impact of those services on the community. Although this project will take more than one year, it is time that public libraries move beyond circulation and reference as measures of their service.

SUSAN DICKENS IS LIMRiCC SECRETARY----Susan Dickens, Administrative Assistant to the Director, has been elected Secretary of the LIMRiCC Board of Directors in a term that extends to 2015. LIMRiCC runs the Purchase of Health Insurance Program (PHIP) in which the Library participates and also the Unemployment Compensation Group Account (UCGA).

APPROVAL OF STRATEGIC PLAN 2013-2016

Mrs. Anthony reported that a Strategic Planning Committee, comprised of representatives of the Library Staff and Board, met five times from February-April. It was recognized that a new Strategic Plan will take the Library through a major transition. Changes in the reading habits of individuals, in the publishing industry, in people’s expectations of the Library, in technology and in the demographics of Skokie are all contributing to fundamental changes in library operations, services, and allocation of physical space.

For years, the Skokie Public Library was known for its outstanding reference collection, while only about 20% of those print materials remain. Ranges of bound periodicals have been withdrawn along with the multi-volumed printed indexes that pointed to articles on various topics. For more than two decades, circulation of materials in print and audiovisual formats continued to increase. With the trend to digital formats and use of eReaders, that pattern will not continue. Some suggest that public library collections will be largely digital within ten years. Perhaps all public libraries will have a shared collection in the Digital Public Library of America. Film formats will be streamed following the digital distribution of music which is already widespread.

While these changes will not be complete within three years, we are headed toward a time when public libraries may look very different than they do today, and the Strategic Planning Committee considered such questions as: What are the evolving roles for the public library? What services will the public need for their lifelong learning, information seeking and discovery? How can the library help people make sense of ever-increasing bits of information they are consuming? Will the library’s importance as a community center increase? What are the major concerns of the community in regard to issues such as economic development, work-force development, health, and immigrant integration and how might the library contribute to addressing those priorities?

The Library has always been more than a collection center, but it is clear that some roles that have been less important will gain in prominence as they become primary vehicles for meeting community needs. To inform the process of selection of a new Vision, Mission, Values, Areas of Strategic Focus, and Goals, the Strategic Planning Committee conducted an environmental scan, reviewing demographic information from the 2010 U.S. Census and GIS and marketing data from CommunityConnect as well as hearing presentations from the Village Planning Supervisor Steve Marciani, District 219 Superintendent Dr. Nanciann Gatta, and English Language Learner Parent Center Director Corrie Wallace.

Some significant demographic developments were noted by the Strategic Planning Committee. The Skokie age distribution is the flattest in fifty years. The biggest growth sector from 2000-2010 was in the “Baby Boomers” from 46-65. There are significantly more 20-34 year olds in the community, most living at home with a parent. Dr. Gatta noted that one third of students graduating from District 219 stay in the community and attend Oakton Community College at least one year. The number of 65-80 year olds has declined and there are 1.38 children for every senior in Skokie. One third of households have a child under 18 while 34% of households have a senior (fewer living alone). A majority (54.4%) of children in public school speak one of 91 languages, the top two being Spanish and Assyrian.

The Director also invited about 45 people to a Community Conversation on the Future of the Public Library. Seventeen people engaged in thoughtful dialogue about changes in publishing and the ways information is accessed, their use of the Library and service expectations, and their own patterns of reading digitally, in print and through audio-books. Participants expressed appreciation for the Library as a source of information and activities for families, for access to computers, support for students, Summer Reading, the Bookmobile, and for assisting recent immigrants in adjusting to life in the U.S. and Skokie. Some liked conveniences such as audiobooks for use in commuting, being able to use a smart phone to access the catalog, downloading digital books, and reserving books and movies online. There were observations about the differences in the way younger people consume media e.g., almost no one under 30 reads a print newspaper, but they consult online services. Sensitivity was expressed toward the cost of proposed Library service developments and the importance of the Library maintaining a position of authority and neutrality.

Another source of information for the Strategic Planning Committee is the Reading and Digital Use Survey conducted from mid-January to early March, 2013. This is the fourth annual survey the Library has completed. Participation was generally proportional to community demographics, with slightly higher participation by 30-49 year olds (including parents, as youth under 18 were under-represented). Most people read in print, as is also reflected in library circulation reports. However, about one third also read eBooks, slightly more than those who listen to audiobooks. (Downloadable audiobooks have a smaller, but growing, use). National reports of the popularity of tablets and eReaders are confirmed in our local survey.

Six subcommittees met and considered areas of emerging importance in library service including:

·        Access Services – This encompasses how people identify, find, and obtain needed information resources whether in person or remotely, physical or digital. How do people discover the electronic databases to which the Library subscribes? Self-published digital titles? Are the Library’s hours suited to the community? Does the Bookmobile provide sufficient access to those who have trouble getting to the Library?

·        21st Century Literacy and Training – Skills needed for success in the 21st century are varied including literacy in English, numeracy, and the ability to use information technology. Opportunities to create with technology and to engage in the use of social media are important as well as the ability to find and evaluate information. Skills in critical thinking and civic literacy contribute to people’s ability to live an independent and engaged life. How can the Library facilitate the continuous acquisition of skills central to lifelong learning for personal and career success?

·        Partnership and Group Work – The Library and its staff have only a portion of the resources required to address the broad needs of individuals and the community. To achieve goals and effect change, the Library needs to work with partners in education, business and throughout the community. Partnerships enable skills and resources to be leveraged. Working with groups offers an economy of scale and targeted access to people with similar needs. With whom should the Library be working? How can staff free up the time needed for successful partnership work? Do staff have the skills needed for this work?

·        Consulting Librarians – People faced with complex problems such as long-term unemployment, or people engaged in research involving information from the pre-digital era cannot simply enter a term on Google and find an answer. Even a request for the best recent titles on a topic is a challenge at a time when over 300,000 titles are published each year, many self-published or by independent presses. How can SPL Librarians most effectively use their expert searching skills and experience to help those who could benefit from them?

·        Programming – Programming has become an important part of lifelong learning for adults as well as for children. Individuals learn, not just by passively listening to a speaker, but by hands-on experience such as in video gaming and through opportunities to discuss issues and ideas from the Civil War to immigration policy. People may consume more information in isolation at their computer or tablet, but they make sense of that information through engagement with others. What is the Library’s role in civic engagement? How can the Library leverage its resources to maximize program offerings and the number of people participating?

·        Local Information – Within the foreseeable future, public libraries may draw on external resources such as the developing Digital Public Library of America for most of our collection needs. Broad, general resource bases miss local resources such as the local newspaper index and the files of the Skokie Historical Society. We already recognize the Library’s unique role in gathering the ongoing contemporary local information in SkokieNet. What other local information might be valuable to persons in this region and beyond if it were organized and digitized for access? Is there a role for the Library in encouraging writing and publishing by local persons?

Each subcommittee presented both an oral report to the Strategic Planning Committee as well as a written report. The written reports were provided in full to the Library Board. Some suggestions which came through quite strongly were for:

·        Library visibility and branding (need for graphic designer)

·        Importance of food to “library as 3rd place” role

·        Extension of Sunday hours to 9pm

·        Training and cross-training for staff

·        Welcome desk and assistance with direction-finding

·        Library’s role in skill development in technology, critical thinking, problem-solving, and other 21st Century skills

·        Personalization of service

·        Community involvement and cultivation of useful partnerships

·        Meeting people where they are

·        Need for outcomes and evaluation tools

·        Greater commitment to library programming

·        Local information as a way for the community to remain invested in the Library

·        Guidance in how to take on new projects without overextending

The Strategic Planning Committee also reviewed the ideas which were brain-stormed at Staff Day 2012 as mixed groups of staff met to consider changes which have occurred in Skokie and the wider world in recent years and the implications for the Library. Some thoughts that came up clearly were:

·        Meet people where they are—in the community and at their need and convenience

·        More and better use of volunteers

·        People’s need for tutorials and one-to-one assistance

·        Continue digital advance without losing personal touch

·        Focus on applied job skills

·        People staying longer at the Library and need food

·        Life skills classes

·        Opportunities for idea exchanges

·        Cross-training staff

·        Gear services to specific user groups

·        Consider bandwidth issues and free Internet in Skokie

Taking in all these ideas from various sources and reviewing them in light of current conditions in Skokie and the Library’s capacity to respond, the Strategic Planning Committee developed the following Vision (for the community and the Library’s role in it), Mission (drives the Library), Values (what is important to the Library), Strategic Focus Areas (opportunities for the Library to have maximum impact in the community), and Goals (guides for development of annual work objectives for the planning period).

The broad value areas of Providing Access, Fostering Learning, and Building Community outline the ways in which the Library can best serve the community. They also suggest ways to align staff efforts and allocate Library resources to achieve desired outcomes.

Mrs. Anthony asked for the Board’s approval of the Vision, Mission, Values, Strategic Focus, and Goals as prepared by the Strategic Planning Committee.

A motion was made by Mrs. Rich, seconded by Dr. Maks:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE VISION, MISSION, VALUES, STRATEGIC FOCUS, AND GOALS FOR FY 2013-2016 AS PREPARED BY THE STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE.

The motion passed unanimously.

APPROVAL OF PROPOSED OBJECTIVES FY 2013-2014

Mrs. Anthony presented the proposed objectives for FY 2013-2014 in support of each of the goal areas in the new Strategic Plan. These objectives outline proposed new initiatives and constitute a work plan for the year.

Several of these objectives are strategic, taking advantage of newly-emerging opportunities and/or needs. For example Goal III, Objective 3 regarding improving access to healthcare for the Assyrian Community, builds on the Skokie Health Department’s top priority in The Skokie Community 2012 Health Plan which is “Improving access to healthcare.” Access to healthcare was also the top concern identified by Skokie residents during the Community Health Plan development process. This objective will also enable Library staff to begin to forge a relationship with the Erie Family Health Center which will be moving to its permanent home near McCormick and Dempster this summer.

Another objective (Goal I, Objective 5) will foster the development of a writers’ support group, acknowledging the growing interest in writing and self-publishing made possible with eBooks. Yet another objective (Goal I, Objective 2) builds on the Library’s growing relationship with the small business community by starting a discussion group for business books.

Work on website redevelopment and customizing Encore will give users new opportunities to interact with these library tools as well as improving patrons’ success in retrieving information. Other objectives further early childhood literacy and development of 21st century literacy, both of which are continuing priorities.

Taken as a whole, the objectives support the new Library mission and are in keeping with Library values concerning Access, Learning and Community.

Discussion followed. A motion was made by Mrs. Parrilli, seconded by Mrs. Rich:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE PROPOSED OBJECTIVES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 AS PRESENTED.

The motion passed unanimously.

APPROVAL OF OUTCOME REPORT ON GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FY 2012-2013

The Outcome Report on Goals & Objectives FY 2012-2013 was distributed by Mrs. Anthony. Major accomplishments for the year include the implementation of Sierra, a new open services platform for our integrated library services platform; the opening of the Business and Career Center; and the production of the first Media Festival of works produced in the Digital Media Lab and the Youth Digital Media Lab.

Coming Together in Skokie with a focus on the Greek culture was a big success with over 5,000 people attending one of sixty programs. Also continuing was the Penny Severns grant program, a family literacy and orientation program for 35 recent immigrant adults and children. The expansion of the Booking with a Buddy program to the ELL Center was a further service to immigrant children.

The Library Kid Campaign was launched to encourage children and their parents to show respect for the Library and to exhibit appropriate behavior while in the Library.

Librarians in Adult Services experimented with types of civic engagement programming to see which might work best here in Skokie.

Librarians in Youth Services introduced initiatives in support of preschool teachers and home daycare providers. The campaign to increase the number of children with cards by working through the schools made gains in several districts.

Implementation of RDA (Resource, Description and Access), the new cataloging rules which will replace AACR2, has begun and staff attended numerous training sessions to prepare for and implement the change.

Some objectives such as the redevelopment of the Teen Corner and reconfiguration of collections in the Readers Services area were not completed, but planning was done in anticipation of changes to occur in FY 2014.

FY 2013 was the last year in the prior planning period so this Outcome Report represents the final achievements for the plan covering FY 2010-2013. Improvements in service delivery and expansion of service capacity were realized.

Mrs. Greer made a motion, seconded by Mrs. Rich:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES ACCEPT THE OUTCOME REPORT ON GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR FY 2012-2013 AS PRESENTED.

The motion passed unanimously.

APPROVAL OF PAVEMENT REPAIRS

Richard Simon, Head of Maintenance, reports that a number of pavement issues are in need of repair or modification.

The sidewalk on the south side of the Library by the book returns needs to be modified in order to accommodate the planned purchase of two larger book returns which will replace the two lower book returns we currently have. To permit the book returns to be functional for persons in smaller vehicles, the base of concrete under the returns needs to be lowered.

It is proposed to remove a section of sidewalk concrete, pour a lower height sidewalk slab and slope the pavement to the drive. Sloping the edge of the sidewalk will permit both the capability to have front door access for bins to the book returns as well as an access to the driveway for the Library snow plow. Currently, there is not a good way to get the snow plow on and off the drive without having two men put a ramp there and an additional person to stop oncoming traffic.

There are large sections of the parking lot’s asphalt pavement on the main drive (west and south sides) that are deteriorating significantly and pose a potential safety risk. The last investment in these areas was prior to the 2003 renovation. Some areas of curb have also been damaged by snow plowing and are in need of repair.

Photos were distributed showing some of the areas to be modified and/or repaired and three quotes from local municipal contractors.

Lorusso Cement Contractors            $40,675.00

L.C.B. Construction                        $42,930.00

Haley Asphalt and Concrete            $43,400.00

Lorusso Cement Contractors, the low bidder, was recommended by Bill Bablitz, Construction Projects Manager, Village of Skokie, who is overseeing the Oakton Street renovation project.

Mrs. Anthony recommends Board acceptance of the proposal from Lorusso Cement Contractors in the amount of $40,675.00 for the pavement work as outlined.

A motion was made by Mrs. Hunter, seconded by Mr. Prosperi:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE PROPOSAL FROM LORUSSO CEMENT CONTRACTORS FOR PAVEMENT WORK IN THE AMOUNT OF $40,675.00.

The roll call vote for approval was unanimous.

APPROVAL OF UNLOCKERS FOR DVDs

The unlocking devices for use with DVDs at check-out have been problematic in that they do not work reliably every time. Staff have been able to adapt to the quirks and work with the devices for staff-assisted check-out. However, patron encounters with the unlockers at the self-check machines have contributed to lower-than-expected use of the self-check equipment. Nearly 658,000 items were checked out at self-check machines in FY 2013 representing approximately one-third of total eligible circulation (e.g., excluding eBooks and Bookmobile). Other libraries with self-check machines have achieved 75%-90% or more of circulation through self-check.

Since January, we have been beta-testing some new DVD unlockers from 3M that are easy to operate and function reliably. The new unlockers are now available for purchase and 3M has offered to sell them to the Library at a 35% discount. The purchase of six new unlockers (one for each self-check station) at the discounted price will be $26,002.00.

Mrs. Anthony requested Board approval of this purchase.

A motion was made by Mrs. Parrilli, seconded by Mr. Prosperi:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVE THE PURCHASE OF SIX (6) NEW UNLOCKERS (ONE FOR EACH SELF-CHECK STATION) FROM 3M IN THE AMOUNT OF $26,002.00.

The roll call vote for approval was unanimous.

APPROVAL OF NON-RESIDENT SERVICES

Public library Boards must annually decide and take action on whether to participate in or opt-out of the non-resident reciprocal borrowing program. This law pertains only to the possibility of providing service to persons “residing outside of a public library service area” and does not affect practice regarding the sale of cards to non-residents of areas already served by a public library. Therefore it would not affect our sale of cards to Chicago residents.

We first discussed this in 2004 due to a revision of the Illinois compiled statues Chapter 75 Act 5, Section 4-7, Paragraph 12 in January, 2002. The effective change was as follows:

A person residing outside of a public library service area must apply for a non-resident library card at the public library located closest to the person’s principal residence. The non-resident cards shall allow for borrowing privileges at all participating libraries in the regional library system only at the library where the card was issued. (New text is underlined. Expired text is lined through.)

Since Skokie does not have a significant neighboring unserved population, I have recommended that the Board approve participation in the program. Since the “closest public library” is determined by school district and the close-by area of Golf does not have public library service, there is a small number (estimated at 50) of students from Golf who attend Niles North and might want to purchase a Skokie Public Library card. In fact, we sold (thirty) 30 non-resident borrowers’cards in 2012, thirty-eight (38) non-resident borrowers’ cards in 2011, and twenty-seven (27) non-resident borrowers’ cards in 2010. Typically, not more than one or two of these cards are sold to Golf residents each year, a volume which does not present a problem. At the present time, there are no Golf residents holding fee cards for the Skokie Public Library, but three Golf residents registered as reciprocal borrowers from Glenview.

Mrs. Anthony recommends Board renew approval of participation in the Non-resident Services program for the year from July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014.

A motion was made by Dr. Maks, seconded by Mrs. Rich:

MOTION:       THAT THE SKOKIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES RENEW PARTICIPATION IN THE NON-RESIDENT SERVICES PROGRAM FOR THE YEAR FROM JULY 1, 2013-JUNE 30, 2014.

The motion passed unanimously.

Dr. Rich entered the meeting at 8:01 p.m.

eBOOKS

The briefing paper, Libraries, Publishers and Public Access to E-Books, from the Urban Libraries Council, was noted.

REACHING ACROSS ILLINOIS LIBRARY SYSTEM (RAILS)

Mrs. Parrilli reported on the RAILS Board of Directors meeting May 24, 2013 held at the Burr Ridge facility and hightlights from the May 29, 2013 RAILS E-News and the May 24 Board of Directors meeting packet:

Treasurer’s Report: Treasurer Jim Kregor announced the balance is $15,800,000 as of April 30, 2013, which includes the deposit of $2,145,000 from the APC Live and Learn fund and the net proceeds from the sale of the Wheeling and Shorewood service centers in the amount of $1,499,993.96. The balance reflects twenty-one months of operating revenue. The mortgage debt on the East Peoria property has been paid in full in the amount of $1,112,031.88.

Executive Director’s Report: Dee Brennan announced that an offer was made for the Geneva Service Center. She will bring the final offer to the June Board meeting. She reported on the status of the Strategic Planning process. A staff retreat has been scheduled at Starved Rock Lodge on July 25, followed by a Board planning session on July 26 at the LaSalle Public Library.

Illinois State Library Report: Anne Craig reported on the various grants awarded and to be awarded throughout the state, including a $50 million grant for state-wide construction projects. The board members discussed at length the importance of libraries to communities and the communities’ support of their libraries.

Area and Per Capita Grant Application: The FY2014 APC application, along with the RAILS long-range plan (2013-2015), was submitted to the Illinois State Library for their review and approval. The long-range plan included the FY2014 estimated budget, listing the revenue at $12,116,306 and the expenses at $10,098,567. The proposed budget also reflects a 3% salary increase to all staff, and $1 million set aside for additional services, such as consulting and LLSAPs.

Delivery and Sorting Request For Proposal: The RAILS Board voted to issue an RFP with various options for outsourcing delivery at the RAILS Burr Ridge service center. The RFP was issued on May 29 and responses are due July 17. RAILS is going through the RFP process to ensure that delivery service is as efficient and cost-effective as possible. The primary goal is improved service to members. RAILS is not obligated to accept any proposal.

Resource Sharing Policy: The Illinois State Library has approved the RAILS revised resource sharing policy, and it is now the official policy that each RAILS full member library is expected to follow to remain a member of RAILS in good standing. The policy is posted in the Resource Sharing section of the RAILS website.

Next meeting: June 21, 2013, at Burr Ridge Service Center.

In addition, Mrs. Parrilli reported that in today’s RAILS electronic newsletter, the Secretary of State and Illinois State library have awarded a grant to RAILS and the Illinois Heartland Library System (IHLS) for the E-books for Illinois Project. The award amount is $985,219. Mrs. Anthony has heard that larger libraries with circulation of 1,000,000+ would be excluded.

COMMENTS FROM TRUSTEES

Mrs. Hunter mentioned the constant decline of circulation of periodicals. Suggestions were made to highlight magazines in a display; put some of the magazines around the library with books on the same/similar subject; or in displays on the west side.

Mrs. Parrilli mentioned the traffic situation on Oakton Street and that signage is really needed. The Village informed Mrs. Anthony that signage will go up when the project is completed.

ADJOURNMENT

At 8:22 p.m. a motion was made by Mr. Graham, seconded by Mrs. Rich to adjourn the regular meeting. The motion passed unanimously.

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            Karen Parrilli, Secretary